No time for old foxes

Got something to say? Use the known and best …

It is hard to express general things in specific ways. You’d be well advised to spin your plays from the song of Troy rather than introduce what noone has said or thought of.

And forget a slow build. Strike for the middle. Think Homer …

He doesn’t start … the Trojan war from the egg containing Helen. He always presses on to the outcome and hurries the reader into the middle of things as though they were quite familiar.

As later even Jerome remembers …

the Horatian witticism: Back to the eggs which Leda laid for Zeus, The bard is fain to trace the war of Troy?

But Horace is not late antiquity. There men build slowly …

as dyers prepare by certain treatments whatever material is to receive the dye, and then apply the color, whether it be purple or some other hue, so we also in the same manner must first, if the glory of the good is to abide with us indelible for all time, be instructed by these outside means, and then shall understand the sacred and mystical teachings

There the old is only a step to the true …

learning to be derived from the poets … the teaching of the pagans (until) … to that other life the Holy Scriptures lead the way, teaching us through mysteries.

Don’t be this man …

He knew many things, but he knew them badly…

Drop everything of the fox …

are we to despise wealth and have contempt for the pleasures of the senses, and yet go seeking for flattery and adulation, and imitate the shiftiness and cunning of the fox

Be the Hedgehog …

The fox knows many a wile; but the hedgehog’s one trick can beat them all.

No time for a Horace.

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