Many pictured Jesus but no one knew what he looked like …

For even the countenance of our Lord Himself in the flesh is variously fancied by the diversity of countless imaginations, which yet was one, whatever it was.

Before Constantine, most saw …

Christ at His first coming appeared inglorious

Even ugly to fulfill prophesy

not even in His aspect comely. For we have announced, says the prophet, concerning Him, (He is) as a little child, as a root in a thirsty land; and there was not in Him attractiveness or glory. And we saw Him, and He had not attractiveness or grace; but His mien was unhonoured, deficient in comparison of the sons of men,

His beauty was truer …

That the Lord Himself was uncomely in aspect, the Spirit testifies by Isaiah … Yet who was more admirable than the Lord? But it was not the beauty of the flesh visible to the eye, but the true beauty of both soul and body, which He exhibited

But could God be not only lowly but ugly? Not for a Greek …

it is impossible that He, to whom was imparted some divine quality beyond other beings, should not differ from others; whereas this person (Jesus) did not differ in any respect from another, but was, as they report, little, and ill-favoured, and ignoble.

Well hold on …

There are, indeed, admitted to be recorded some statements respecting the body of Jesus having been ill-favoured; not, however, ignoble, as has been stated, nor is there any certain evidence that he was little. The language of Isaiah runs as follows, who prophesied regarding Him that He would come and visit the multitude, not in comeliness of form, nor in any surpassing beauty … (but think of) the words of the forty-fifth Psalm, and why it is then said, Gird Thy sword upon Thy thigh, O most mighty, with Thy comeliness and beauty; and continue, and prosper, and reign.

Ah, a favorable prediction. Kingly, comely, a Jesus for Constantine …

He was full of great grace; and to declare this the prophet said, Fair in beauty beyond the children of men.

And Isaiah? …

And if Esaias (Isaiah) saith, He hath no form nor comeliness, he affirms it either in comparison of the glory of His Godhead, which surpasses all utterance and description; or as declaring what took place at His passion, and the dishonor which He underwent at the season of the cross, and the mean estate which throughout His life He exemplified in all respects.

Feel free to picture the beautiful, suitable for his elevated Church.